JOHN FROW GENRE PDF

JOHN FROW GENRE PDF

This second edition of John Frow’s Genre offers a comprehensive and accessible introduction to the area. Genre is a key means by which we. Genre has 72 ratings and 8 reviews. Jonathan said: A solid theoretical view of the idea of genre and generic classing systems is offered here by John Fr. In “Approaching Genre” John Frow begins by conveying the implicit rules of understanding a rhetorical text: “the knowledge the reader is.

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Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Preview — Genre by John Frow. Genre by John Frow. Genre is a key means by which we categorize the many forms of literature and culture. But it is also much more than that: Understanding genre as a dynamic process rather than a set of stable rules, this book explores: Paperbackpages.

Published November 14th by Routledge first published September 19th To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Genreplease sign up. Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia. A solid theoretical view of the idea of genre and generic classing systems is offered here by John Frow.

For those reading this who have no idea who John Frow is he is a professor at Melbourne University which I do not attend by the way but could have if I’d wished. Either way this book is an insightful look into the theory of genre.

Genre by John Frow

Frow’s overall argument is rfow genre is not limited to merely looking at entertainment forms such as books, films or music items. He argues that genres and generi A solid theoretical view of the idea of genre and generic classing systems is offered here by John Frow.

He argues that genres and generic structures are interlinked with our various cultures and that as such different genres take on meaning in different contexts. But he also questions whether genres are set in concrete or whether they are fluid. He uses the example of a newspaper headline: For instance you may need to understand that the judge referred to gave an earlier lenient sentence to a tried rapist.

Summary: Frow’s “Approaching Genre” and “Literary Genre Theory”

You may also need to understand the connotations of various words such as the fact that storm here is not referring to a literal storm but a metaphor for the outrage at the idea that the same judge is giving more lenient sentences. There are also various suppositions imposed about the genre this headline genfe to.

As part of an article it is therefore supposed that it is a factual and real-life story being explored rather than a novel with a fictitious judge. Although however in the context of a narrative this headline may become fictional and therefore will need to be understood differently. Again Frow points out that were he to write: He therefore indicates that the genre which anything belongs to relies heavily on already known knowledge and context. That when similar ideas are placed in different contexts the genre they belong to may change.

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He also discusses yenre as taxonomical structures.

He fgow to them as a frame for understanding the world, that they provide a “horizon of expectations. That when I go to a supermarket I expect to be able to buy different produce than at a delicatessen or a pharmacy. In the same way when I pick up a romance I have different expectations to a science fiction or fantasy novel and understand that novel within the context of its genre.

All in all Frow makes a convincing argument that genre is connected to culture, context and requires knowledge external to the genre itself to understand. In this way all texts are not bound to one genre but belong to one main genre, under which they may be part of a sub-genre for example Dracula belongs to the horror genre and in particular the Gothic sub-genre. His idea that genres provide a “horizon of expectations” helps the reader to observe that generic structures are not limited to the artistic field but are culturally bound.

It is also interesting to think of how context alters the way we perceive genre. In this way it is possible to see that the iconography of a text helps us to perceive which genre it belongs to. Fantasy novels have particular lands and characters that are different to sci-fi but perhaps if fro were to add technology into The Lord of the Rings it may appear more as a sci-fi.

This is a very worthwhile discussion on genre if you are interested in analysing it and a convincing argument. John Frow certainly knows his area of expertise and makes many valid points about genre and most importantly allows the reader to think for themselves about the nature of genres. Mar 26, Matt rated it liked it. I somehow decided this would be a good book to teach to my students, which is probably not entirely accurate. I think the book is, in places, a little too academic for classroom purposes– there’s a lot of building arguments from arguments made elsewhere and I think some of that might go right over my students’ heads.

And it’s tricky stuff, this genre business What I did is isolate three gente three, five, and six– that I think are most teachable, and while I’ll review that decision th I somehow decided this would be a good book to teach to my students, which is probably not entirely accurate. What I did is isolate three chapters– three, five, rrow six– that I think are most teachable, and while I’ll review that decision this summer, that’s where I’m at now.

Genre: The New Critical Idiom – John Frow – Google Books

It’s good that those chapters, and really, most of the chapters in the second half of the book are mostly more or less standalone. In my memory, you couldn’t say that about the first two chapters, which were the toughest in the book for me to get through.

I think the intro makes claims for the reach of the book and the profound implications of genre that Frow never really lives up to. But on the other side of things, there’s a really great glossary at the end that never gets mentioned everywhere that, from my jlhn investigation, really does offer lucid and jargon-free explications of the language.

I didn’t even find it till I came to the end, but if you’re reading the book, I think you might like to know it’s there– Frow’s interests and reading is wide-ranging, and I think the glossary helps for following those areas of his argument where you might not be so strong. Aug 31, Gabriel rated it it was ok.

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Never send an English Professor to do a Philosopher’s job In general, I felt like the analysis was superficial.

Sufficient for an introductory or summary text. Good points, yes, but nothing stuck nor was anything novel added to the discussion about genre, in my humble opinion. The author could have taken time to look at how contemporary philosophy has dealt with the notion of natural kinds.

I believe this might surprisingly help assist or provide tools for a richer analysis of generic Never send an English Professor to do a Philosopher’s job I believe this might surprisingly help assist or provide tools for a richer analysis of generic concepts.

Instead, the predictable and drudging nods are made to Plato, Aristotle, Goethe, and Lewis. Though, I did like Frow’s use of Gricean conversational implicature, or how he argues that generic concepts are employed to bolster necessary background knowledge for interpreting speech beyond cases friw literal or referential meaning.

Of course, my bias comes out here So, yeah, the problems I’m harping on are likely on me; I’m still looking for that book on genre that yenre my specific questions and dare I say vindicates my already conceived suspicions about the matter. I’m a big fat jerk. Jan 20, Kyra rated it liked it.

It was suggested to me that I read this book for work. In general, the discussions of specific texts were reasonably interesting and thought-provoking, but I drow with the more general theoretical material, perhaps in part because I’m not sure I find the concept of genre as explored in this text to be a particularly useful one for my own interests. Feb 12, Lawrence rated it liked it Shelves: Janani Ananthanarayanan rated it did not like it May 16, Bill Hughes rated it really liked it Mar 01, Janne Typpi genee it liked it May 09, JDM rated jon really liked it Dec 14, Caroline rated it really liked it May 08, David rated it liked jhn Apr 04, Anamarija rated it really liked it May 16, Hannah rated it it was amazing Feb 24, Aly Zhang rated it really liked it Sep 24, Lisajean rated it liked it Oct 16, Bob rated it it was ok Jul 23, Melanie rated it liked it Jan 14, Malcolm Schwantler rated nohn it was amazing Feb 16, Carrie Callahan rated it really liked it Dec 31, Jessica rated it really liked it Nov 24, Kimberly rated it liked it Mar 28, Richard Gaunt rated it really liked it Jun 10, Emma rated it liked it May 28, Joshua Barsczewski rated it liked it Sep 07, Samantha Stuart rated it liked it Dec 10, Jul 17, Benjamin De lee rated it liked it.

Useful introduction–but not sure how accurate it is for ancient or medieval literature. Bridget rated benre liked it Aug 22, Flo B rated it liked it Dec 24, There are no discussion topics on this book yet.